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U of Akron biomedical engineer looks to improve cancer treatment

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is funding the research of a University of Akron (UA) scientist that could lead to more effective cancer treatment, the university announced. 
Dr. Hossein Tavana and students in his Tissue Engineering Microtechnologies lab recently developed and patented a method to make 3D cultures of clustered cancer cells (called spheroids) that better mimic tumors in the body than the 2D cultures used in traditional methods (in which a thin layer of cells is treated on a flat, plastic dish), ultimately allowing for more accurate drug testing, according to the article.

This resulted from a 2013 NIH grant to Tavana, an associate professor of biomedical engineering in UA's College of Engineering.

Tavana is a BMES member.
 
Now the team is using a new, three-year, $467,312 grant from the NIH's National Cancer Institute (NCI) to model the response of colon cancer cells to anticancer drugs. “Understanding how cancer cells are able – as often happens – to resist those drugs is a major step toward improving treatments,” Tavana said. 

Read more HERE.

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