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Liquid Assembly Line to Produce Drug Microparticles

University of Pennsylvania engineers developed a microfluidic system in which more than ten thousand of these devices run in parallel, all on a silicon-and-glass chip that can fit into a shirt pocket, to produce a paradigm shift in microparticle manufacturing, according to a Penn Bioengineering post.
The team, led by David Issadore, Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering, outlined the design of their system in the journal Nature Communications. Issadore is a BMES member.
 
The Penn team first tested their system by making simple oil-in-water droplets, at a rate of more than 1 trillion droplets per hour. Using materials common to current drug manufacturing processes, they manufactured polycapralactone  microparticles at a rate of ‘only' 328 billion particles per hour. Further testing backed by pharma company GlaxoSmithKline will follow.

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